September 2013

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The school system around here had a half day yesterday for some reason. We decided to join them and I got a little DIY done while the kids played outside.

The rustic shelves were pretty easy to pull off. The wood was totally free as it was wood left over from the kids doing board breaking at Tae Kwon Do! I think they all kept the first board they ever broke, but now the wood just piles up. I’m glad I thought of something to do with part of it!

I knew I wanted the shelves to be no deeper than 3 inches as the space I wanted them for is right by a mirror. I looked at all the home improvement stores, Walmart, Target, Michaels, Hob Lob. No one had shelves that were only 3 inches deep. Plus I wanted them to be only about a foot long. Lucky for me, the extra wood I had was already a foot long. I saw the idea for the rustic shelves from Ana White in John and Sherry Petersik’s book, Young House Love: 243 Ways to Paint, Craft, Update & Show Your Home Some Love. I measured three inches and pulled out my new friend, the jigsaw!

And yes, I let ds15 try it out this time.  He was so funny. He cut one of the boards for me and said, “OK. What’s the big deal?”

After the wood was cut and sanded, I painted them with a white wash and then sanded again and applied one coat of antique glaze. I bought a couple of packs of “L” brackets at Lowes (the only thing I had to buy for this project) and got to work with my power drill. First, I put the bracket where I wanted it and then marked the holes with a pencil.

Then I drilled a small hole in each marked spot, put the bracket back on, and screwed the screws in by hand. (I didn’t use the power drill to screw in the screws because I didn’t really have anything to stabilize the shelves at this point, and it would have been hard to drill in the screws closest to the brackets.)

I did the same thing to put the brackets on the wall: mark the holes, drill, screw in by hand. In no time at all, I had very stable shelves. (photos are a little crazy because the mirror kept reflecting right on the shelves.)

And that, folks, completes the master bathroom. Whoo hoo!! I’m so excited to have a room completely done. Let’s take a tour!

First, the rug that started it all. The beachy theme for the bathroom grew out of this rug I found on clearance at Target:

Above the tub, I have turquoise and white towels, a small round mirror, the boat craftand a Monet print I’ve had since high school:

master bath tub side

master bath towel side

I love the little shell set up by the faucet:

master bath shells

And here is the other side of the room:

master bath sink side

master bath medicine cabinet mirror

To the left is the medicine cabinet and toilet with the framed seashell photos

master bath toilet side

And the little stool I distressed…

master bath anchor stool

My seagull with the turquoise wing and a candle holder from Michaels grace the top of the medicine cabinet:

master bath seagull

To the right is the sink with the new rustic shelving!

master bath sink side close up

Again, the shelves were hard to photograph due to the mirror, but here they are decked out with a few fun and functional things:

master bath shelves

A ship in the bottle lives on the top shelf,

master bath ship in a bottle

and little buckets (from the dollar bin at Target) and a rope ball live on the bottom shelf. The buckets hold cotton balls and q-tips.

master bath cotton balls and qtips

The “Life’s a Beach” sign makes me smile every time I look at it. I used a 40% off coupon at Hobby Lobby ages ago and paid about $5 for it.

lifes a beach sign

I’m so happy with how it all turned out!! It was a lot of work and a lot of details, but it was so. much. fun to pull it all together! I wish the rest of the house was as clean as the master bathroom!

*This post contains an affiliate link. If you click on the link, I will get a small percentage of the profit. Or you can go directly to the site to order.

Daffodil’s Weekend Links

Happy weekend everyone! Can you believe tomorrow is the first day of fall? The leaves are turning in upstate New York and it is beautiful. We are all going to the annual Farm Festival today in our area to have a hay ride, pick apples and eat hot cider doughnuts. Tomorrow is my second son’s 13th birthday. Two teenagers in the house now!

Here are some wonderful projects and ideas I noticed on the net this week. Remember to please pin from the source so the author gets the credit!

I found this easy pumpkin art tutorial while visiting linky parties last week. It’s so easy even an 8 year old can do it! I know because we all did it for a homeschool art class this week. Well, we did the first part anyway. We’ll finish them up next week. They are so beautiful and classy.


I’ve been especially noticing painted antique dressers and cedar chests now that I’m trying to decide what to do with mine. This blue painted one with a stenciled top turned out beautiful.

painted cedar chest Now that I’m finished decorating my fall porch, I’m looking for ideas for my mantel. My mother-in-law would love this one:

I’m not sure what dh would think if I came home with an old goat cart, but I love this display so much I just might do it if I ever saw one for cheap. She mentioned that it gets dressed up for Christmas, too.

goat cart
That’s it for this weekend. Go have some fall fun, everyone!! I’ll pick an apple for ya.

All the projects I’ve attempted lately have taken longer than I thought they would. This one is no exception. It isn’t hard, but it takes a few steps. Also, this project has infinite possibilities. I’ll give you a list of the materials I used, but I’d encourage you to scrounge around and use whatever you have laying around.

Materials:

Plank of wood – 1 used a 5/8″ thick piece of plywood I had on hand
Sandpaper
Paint in four fall colors – I mixed to get what I needed but basically I used brown, red, orange and yellow
Twine
Letter stencils (you can make your own!)
Stencil bonding spray
Antique glaze (optional)

Tools:

Jigsaw (or get Home Depot to cut for you)
Power drill

Step 1:
Mark and cut the plywood into 7 squares. (mine are 4 1/2″ inch squares)

You may have guessed from my previous post this week that I was just a little bit excited to finally learn to use my jigsaw. It was easy peasy to cut up the wood with the jigsaw!!

After handsawing one tiny little boat (with the help of two big strong boys), I’m totally in awe of people from ages past like Pa Ingalls from Little House on the Prairie that built houses with just a few hand tools!! Actually, incredulous might be a better word!

Step 2:

Drill a hole in the top center and the bottom center of each square, about 1/2 an inch from the top. Use a drill bit large enough to accommodate your twine folded in half but small enough that if you knot your twine, it won’t go through the hole.

Step 3:
Roughly sand the squares so you don’t get splinters in your fingers. This is supposed to look rustic so don’t spend huge amounts of time sanding.

Step 4:
Paint your squares. I wanted to alternate colors, so I painted 2 oranges, 2 reds and 3 browns. You can use any color combination you want! You probably want to allow these to dry overnight so your stencils won’t stick to them. I only used one coat of paint on each square.

Feel free to mix your paint colors to achieve the look you want. The only orange I had on hand was too bright for fall, so I mixed some yellow acrylic paint (Basics brand Cadmium Yellow Deep Hue) with a free sample pot of paint from Lowes dyed to Pantone Bossa Nova.

Step 5:
Stencil your letters onto your squares. You can hand paint you letter on if you wish. I just wanted the project to go a little faster so I made stencils (I realize that probably didn’t make things go faster!). I used a font called AR JULIAN and blew it up to 300. Each letter was printed on card stock and cut out with an X-Acto knife. I used Elmer’s bonding spray to adhere the stencils to the squares.

The best thing to do is spray a very light coat and wait five minutes before sticking it to the wood. Press it on very well around the edges of the letters to prevent bleeding. It should peel right off when you’re done. (Don’t wait for the paint to dry. Peel it off as soon as you finish painting.)

Step 6:
After the paint dries, distress the squares a bit with sandpaper.

Step 7:
This step is totally optional, but you can cover each square with antique glaze if you have some on hand. I painted it on and then wiped most of it off. It didn’t change much — just softened the brightness a bit.

Step 8:
Lay all of your squares out in a row and stretch your twine across them. Double the twine and give yourself a good 5 – 10 inches or more extra on each end for good measure.

Step 9:
With your twine folded in half, stick it down through the bottom hole of the bottom letter (from the top down because you want the twine to stretch across the back of each letter). Pull it nearly all the way through, leaving about 8 inches or so loose on the bottom. Make a knot right by the hole.

Now pull the twine up through the top hole of the same letter and knot.

Make another knot about 1 1/4″ from the previous knot and put the twine down through the bottom hole of the next letter.

Repeat until all the letters are strung and you have a loop at the top. I pulled my loop through the twine on the back of the top letter and tied an extra knot at the on the very top for a little extra durability.

Step 10:
Tie double knots on the loose pieces of twine at the bottom and hang your Welcome craft by the front door. I also took a double piece of twine and tied a bow at the top of the sign.

bow at top

And there you have it. A homemade rustic Welcome sign for your front porch or entryway.